Hunters Spend Billions Annually, Numbers Rising

National Shooting Sports Foundation and The Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation have released two new reports documenting the importance of sportsmen’s activities in America.

aHunter2NSSF’s Hunting in America: An Economic Force for Conservation and CSF’s America’s Sporting Heritage, Fueling the American Economy reports provide detailed information about participation and expenditures by American sportsmen and women. The reports were released in January during the Shooting, Hunting and Outdoor Trade Show in Las Vegas.

“Many people may not fully comprehend how important hunting and fishing are to the fabric of this country,”┬ásaid Jeff Crane, President of the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation. “Yet there are more people who hunt or fish than go bowling, and their spending would land them at #24 on the Fortune 500 list.

“CSF has put together this report, utilizing data from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Shooting Sports Foundation, the American Sportfishing Association and the National Marine Manufacturers Association, in order to provide these real-world comparisons to what many consider more ‘mainstream’ industries and activities.”

The NSSF report, part of the foundation for CSF’s information, provides a detailed look at hunters and the trends in participation and spending. Information on 40-plus categories of U.S. hunting-related expenditures, which grew 55 percent, are outlined in NSSF’s report as well as state by state statistics for number of hunters, retail sales, taxes and jobs.

“The major growth of spending by hunters is good news for businesses throughout the country, particularly small businesses in rural areas,” said NSSF President and CEO Steve Sanetti. “It also is gratifying to see the nine percent increase in hunting participation. Not only is the traditional male hunter going afield more often, but more women and novices are going hunting as well, demonstrating the widespread appeal of this great outdoors tradition.”

The CSF report spotlights some of the most compelling data for hunters and anglers. For example, the 15.5 million hunters age 6 and up could fill every NASCAR track, NFL stadium, NBA arena, MLB ballpark and NHL rink in the country more than twice (15.5 million vs. 7.2 million combined capacity).

In addition, anglers spent $47.7 billion in 2011, which is more than the revenues for Lockheed Martin that year ($46.9 billion). Similar comparisons for many other participation and spending statistics are found throughout the CSF report.

The fishing industry also developed a more detailed analysis of anglers’ impacts on the nation’s economy and fisheries conservation that was released earlier this month. The American Sportfishing Association’s Sportfishing in America: An Economic Force for Conservation reports the number of anglers increased 11 percent since 2006 while fishing tackle sales grew more than 16 percent. When expenditures are multiplied by the nation’s 60 million anglers, their dollars have a significant impact on our nation’s economy.

A number of reports strongly indicate that American families identify fishing as one of the best ways to spend quality time together. According to the National Sporting Goods Association, fishing as a leisure-time activity ranks higher than playing basketball or softball, skateboarding, jogging or hiking.

A new component of the CSF report this year is the inclusion of details on the recreational boating industry. Research from the National Marine Manufacturers Association shows that more than one million boats changed hands in 2011 with sales of all watercraft (including sail boats, personal water craft, etc.), totaling $15 billion. In addition, 83 million adults in the U.S. participated in recreational boating that year.

Beyond the impact to businesses and local economies, sportsmen and women are the leaders in protecting fish and wildlife and their habitats.

When you combine license and stamp fees, motorboat fuels, excise taxes on hunting and fishing equipment and membership contributions to conservation organizations, hunters and anglers directed $3 billion towards on-the-ground conservation and restoration efforts in 2011 — that is over $95 every second. This does not include their own habitat acquisition and restoration work for lands owned or leased for the purpose of hunting and fishing, which would add another $11 billion to the mix.

Get .pdf copies of both reports HERE

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